Tuesday, August 9, 2022

Tragedy Averted

I almost made a terrible blunder.

See https://github.com/slott56/py-web-tool for some background. This is a "Literate Programming" tool. I started fooling around with this kind of thing back in '05 (maybe even earlier.) This is not the blunder. The whole idea of literate programming is not very popular. I'm a fan of Jupyter{Book} as the state of the art in sophisticated literate programming, if you're interested in it.

In my case, I started this project so long ago, I used docutils. This was long before Sphinx arrived on the scene. I never updated my little project to use Sphinx. The point was to have a kind of pure literate programming tool that could work with a variety of markup languages, including (but not limited to) RST.

Recently, I learned about PlantUML. The idea of a text description of a diagram is appealing. I don't really need to draw it; I just need to specify what's in it and let graphviz do the rest. This tool is very, very cool. You can capture ideas quickly. You can refine and expand on ideas until you reach a point where code makes more sense than a picture of code. 

For some things, you can gather data and draw a picture of things *as they are*. This is particularly valuable for cloud-based infrastructure where a few queries leads to PlantUML source that is depicted very nicely.

Which leads to the idea of Literate Programming including UML diagrams. 

Doesn't sound too difficult. I can create an extension to docutils to introduce a UML directive. The resulting RST would look like this:

..  uml::

    left to right direction
    skinparam actorStyle awesome

    actor "Developer" as Dev
    rectangle PyWeb {
        usecase "Tangle Source" as UC_Tangle
        usecase "Weave Document" as UC_Weave
    }
    rectangle IDE {
        usecase "Create WEB" as UC_Create
        usecase "Run Tests" as UC_Test
    }
    Dev --> UC_Tangle
    Dev --> UC_Weave
    Dev --> UC_Create
    Dev --> UC_Test

    UC_Test --> UC_Tangle

This could be handy to have the diagrams as part of the documentation that tangles the working the code. One source for all of it. 

I started down the path of researching docutils extensions. Got pretty far. Far enough that I had an empty repository and everything. I was about ready to start creating spike solutions.

Then.

[music cue] *duh duh duuuuuuh*

I found that Sphinx already has an extension for PlantUML. I almost started reading the code to see how it worked.

Then I realized how dumb that was. It already works. Why read the code? Why not install it?

I had a choice to make.

  1. Continue building my own docutils plug-in.
  2. Switch to Sphinx.

Some complications:

  • My Literate Programming tool produces RST that *may* not be compatible with Sphinx.
  • It's yet another dependency in a tool that started out with zero dependencies. I've added pytest and tox. What next? 

What to do?

I have to say that Git is amazing. I can make a branch for the spike. If it works, pull request. If it doesn't work, delete the branch. This continues to be game-changing to me. I'm old. I remember when we had to back up the whole project directory tree before making this kind of change.

It worked. My tool's RST (with one exception) worked perfectly with Sphinx. The one exception was an obscure directive, .. class:: name, used to provide an HTML class name for the following block. This always should have been the docutils .. container:: name directive. With this fix, we're good to go.

I'm happy I avoided the trap of reimplementing something. Instead of that, I upgraded from "bare" docutils with my own CSS to Sphinx with it's sophisticated templates and HTML Themes.

Tuesday, August 2, 2022

Books! Books! Books!

First, there's 

Pivot to Python

A Guide for professionals and skilled beginners

https://books.apple.com/us/book/pivot-to-python/id1586977675 

I've recently updated this to fix some cosmetic problems with title pages, the table of contents and stuff like that. The content hasn't changed. Yet. It's still an introduction to Python for folks who already know how to program, they want to pivot to programming in Python. Quickly.

But wait, there's more. 

Unlearning SQL

When your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail

https://books.apple.com/us/book/unlearning-sql/id6443164060

This is all new. It's written for folks who know Python, and are struggling with the architectural balance between writing bulk processing in SQL or writing it in Python. For too many developers, SQL is effectively the only tool they can use. With a variety of tools, it becomes easier to solve a wider variety of problems.