Tuesday, April 12, 2022

Pelican and Static Web Content

In Static Site Blues I was wringing my hands over ways to convert a ton of content from a two different proprietary tools (the very old iWeb, and the merely old Sandvox) into something I could work with.

After a bit of fiddling around, I'm delighted with Pelican.

First, of course, I had to extract all the iWeb and Sandvox content. This was emphatically not fun. While both used XML, they used it in subtly different ways. Apple's frameworks serialize internal state as XML in a way that preserves a lot of semantic details. It also preserves endless irrelevant details.

I wound up with a Markdown data structure definition, plus a higher-level "content model" with sites, pages, blogs, blog entries and images. Plus the iWeb extractor and the Sandvox extractor. It's a lot of code, much of which lacks solid unit test cases. It worked -- once -- and I was tolerant of the results.

I also wound up writing tools to walk the resulting tree of Markdown files doing some post-extraction cleanup. There's a lot of cleanup that should be done.

But.

I can now add to the blog with the state of my voyaging. I've been able to keep Team Red Cruising up to date.

Eventually (i.e., when the boat is laid up for Hurricane Season) I may make an effort to clean up the older content and make it more consistent. In particular, I need to add some annotations around anchorages to make it possible to locate all of the legs of all of the journeys. Since the HTML is what most people can see, that means a class identifier for lat-lon pairs. 

As it is, the blog entries are *mostly* markdown. Getting images and blockquotes even close to readable requires dropping to HTML to make direct use of the bootstrap CSS. This also requires some comprehensive cleanup to properly use the Bootstrap classes. (I think I've may have introduced some misspelled CSS classes into the HTML that aren't doing anything.)

For now, however, it works. I'm still tweaking small things that require republishing *all* the HTML.